The Definitive Review Of All Japanese All The Time (AJATT)

The Definitive Review Of All Japanese All The Time (AJATT)

The first post in the “Can You Learn Japanese Simply By Having Fun” series has apparently sparked a debate over my site and another similar Japanese language learning site All Japanese All The Time (AJATT). I’m going to take this opportunity to finally write a post I’ve been considering for a while on this subject, as a lot of users of his site use mine (and vice versa). Let me just set two things straight right from the beginning that may be confusing some readers:

1. The posts in this “learn by fun” series are not in any way intended to attack AJATT at all.
2. I like and recommend AJATT.

But just to make sure everyone understands what is going on here, a brief introduction is in order about his site and the controversy surrounding certain aspects of it:

Welcome to AJATT

AJATT is a popular language learning blog created by Khatzumoto and was created around 2006 (it may have been earlier, as his original site was deleted due to bad hosting). His story is that he learned Japanese in 18 months by having fun and started at the age of 21. Through his self-created method (which borrows on immersion concepts, Remembering the Kanji, and a spaced repetition system like Anki), by September 2005, he had learned enough to read technical material, conduct business correspondence and job interviews in Japanese, and the following month, landed a job as a software engineer at a large Japanese company in Tokyo. He has been living in Japan ever since.

Khatzumoto’s method didn’t involve classes or textbooks or living in Japan. It involved spending 18-24 hours a day doing something, anything in Japanese (“all Japanese, all the time”). Despite the time commitment, he did this while being a full-time student majoring in computer science at a university, with intensive coursework, jobs, a non-Japanese significant other, and far from Japan and Japanese people.

His philosophy is simple with two major principles:

1. The belief that he could become fluent in Japanese
2. Constantly doing fun stuff in Japanese

And the original goal of his site is to:

1. Tell you how he learned Japanese by having fun, so that you can do it, too.
2. Give you some new cool tools that he did not have, and that would have made things much faster and easier for him.

His website has significantly changed over the years, but it is split up into a number of free and paid components:

Main Blog (free):

This is where it all started, and provides his experience and advice over the years with an abundant amount of posts on techniques, motivation, challenges, and strategy. He still continues to update about once a week. Khatzumoto writes in a humorous and casual style. He is a smart guy and quite knowledgeable about Japanese and study methods, has great and original ideas, and has made a real difference to many people who study Japanese.

Controversial:
- He is repetitious and his articles long winded as he sometimes takes concepts he has covered before and rewrites them with a different angle or take on them.
- His writing has a dirty edge (low brow) and is off-putting to certain people.

Surusu (free):

His own creation of an SRS like Anki (Spaced Repetition System) which he runs from his site.

Store ($):

Various online Japanese study related products  he has created such as Anki decks and short guidebooks.

Controversial: 
- The site has an aggressive and in your face way of marketing its products.
- He uses limited supply tactics (despite being electronic items) on certain products.

AJATT PLUS ($$):

An extended version of his regular blog requiring membership.  It includes exclusive posts and Japanese materials, free access to products, a membership-only forum, and higher priority contact and e-mail. The AJATT Plus is fairly cheap, and the cost varies at $10~15 depending on how you pay for it.

Controversial:
- He is charging for a private forum and articles where other sites do the same for free.

Silverspoon Neutrino ($$$):

A 595-day automated program which follows you daily as your own mini Japanese trainer until you reach fluency.

Controversial:
- Silverspoon Neutrino costs thousands of dollars for an automated e-product, has a refund policy of requiring you to wait for the 595 days to be over before asking for it, and value is questionable.

***Please see the comment below about one person having significant difficulty in getting a full refund back after he was unsatisfied with the product.***

My Thoughts On AJATT

I already mentioned I like AJATT. All the “controversy” statements above are what you will find strewn across the internet. So what are my actual thoughts on the site?

Fun and Learning

Some people briefly look at his method and think that he is a “Mr. All-Fun Learner” that I just discussed and is merely stating “just put Japanese in your life as much as you can and have fun and you’ll be fluent.” His method is much deeper than this, and requires a thorough viewing of his site.

Writing Style

Some of his articles really appeal to me, are fresh and animated, and hit me exactly with what I need. Others lack punch and usually get a mere skim.

Cost

People who don’t write blogs on the internet don’t realize the ridiculous amount of time that goes into good writing. Even articles at a small 500 words which takes a reader a minute or so to read sometimes take 4-6+ hours to write. Having smooth and compelling writing, despite being short, is an arduous and lengthy task.

And we have full time jobs. This kind of free time just doesn’t appear out of nowhere. Now I don’t know Khatzumoto personally and while his writing style significantly differs from my own, it is still clean and well edited and I assume takes plenty of time. Think about it. I have published around 210 articles on this site: If you take the low end and say that each article was around 3-4 hours, that is around 600-800 hours spent on writing. Why do you think I only can write about one article a week?

Now yes, I obviously like writing on JALUP. I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t. And I’m assuming Khatzumoto is the same with AJATT. But you reach a point where you would like to earn some money. This provides for two things: it gives you more free time to write more, and it is personally rewarding to know that you are doing something you love, helping other people out, and getting paid for it.

So while his products aren’t for everybody, and you are to judge for yourself what you need, I think it is admirable that he is trying to turn his passion into his livelihood. You could blame me for the same thing and say that I shouldn’t be charging for Anki decks, personal advice, and Japanese lessons. But I like what I’m doing here, and money allows me to do more of that.

His most controversial product now is Silverspoon. Now yeah, this is expensive for online material. He makes a comparison that the average Japanese learner spends several times this going to schools that don’t come anywhere close to making someone fluent in Japanese. I think that if you have the money to spend, and you are the type of person that needs the constant reinforced motivation, the product is worth the money. We create products to meet the needs of the market. One of the top requests of learners is that they wish they had someone constantly motivating them, guiding them forward, and acting as their navigator.

The JALUP and AJATT comparison

Plenty of people have compared the two sites before. Some put them in the same camp. Some put one over the other. Whatever you think about the two, that’s fine. There are definitely influences from AJATT here and I don’t hide them. There are plenty of areas that we agree on. There are others we disagree on. I can tell you one thing for sure though: we both have 5 letters in our title.

Discussion And Respect

People love, love, love to discuss methods. And for some reason AJATT is always on the top of discussion lists. If you want to discuss it, I encourage you to do so in the comments below, as this is a good place for users of both JALUP and AJATT to voice their opinions. However please remember one absolute here:

Don’t insult each other’s methods

People grow emotionally attached to the method they are using. It’s been their side kick, their guide, their close friend on the incredibly difficult journey of Japanese. How do you think it makes people feel when you try tearing it apart telling them it is worthless and stupid. People are different and use different methods for different reasons. Respect goes a long way when it comes to language learning.

————————————————
Okay this went way longer than I thought. Don’t worry, the next post will be the important continuation to the “Can You Learn Japanese Simply By Having Fun” series.

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Adam Shapiro

Adam Shapiro

(Adshap) - Founder of Jalup. Spends most of his time absorbing and spreading wild and thrilling (at least he thinks so) information about Japan and the Japanese language to the rest of the world.

Comments

The Definitive Review Of All Japanese All The Time (AJATT) — 25 Comments

  1. One thing I think you should have mentioned with AJATT is the organization of the site.

    I went there once or twice because I had seen people say that’s what they were using. I felt lost most of the time.
    And when I did finally find some newbie level posts… I felt that if I wanted any sort of moderation in my learning I was terrible and would never learn.
    I never actually found out what the purpose of the site was – other than to tell me full immersion is the only way to learn. Which could have been said in a paragraph. I still don’t know of anything helpful from AJATT.

    No, I did not read every article. As somebody new to a site, I’d like to find things relatively easy. And when I do find something, I’d rather not be talked down to. I read probably three or four things before I asked “how is this helping?” and gave up on it.

    • I totally agree with you on this. There are actually a lot of great old posts that I would love to recommend to beginners, but just can’t find. It used to be better organized. I think the disorganization also adds to the feeling that the blog is repetitive.

      If you had caught the blog in the early stages of its life, you probably would’ve been better helped out by it.

    • Honestly I find it hard to believe you missed the big “NEW? START HERE!” button that leads you to the “How To Use This Website” article …

      • Have you read what that article says? It says to just jump in and read anything and then apply it.
        Well thanks. That was insightful.

        I didn’t read anything about him using RTK. Or how to get started actually learning.

        I dunno about you, but when I’m at around 400 kanji, it’s pretty hard to just start reading manga or books or anything. I’ve tried. I spent an hour on one page. That stopped being enjoyable by page 2.

        • A month ago that was a like to the table of contents and in the table of contents there was a link to the chronoligical list of articles, including everything… THAT was good I think

          • I did eventually find the table of contents… And the stuff for starting… well I didn’t feel like it gave any actual advice.

            That was where I found the admonishment for not having complete and utter immersion. And where I found that I should be forgoing furniture and silverware. The few articles I read were not at all helpful to actually learning the language. Maybe my selection of articles was poor. But if after an hour on a site I’ve garnered no new information, I have no desire to keep trying. Especially when I find the tone to be somewhat negative.
            It may be a good site for some people, but the clutter and tone do not work for me.

            Compare it with my initial hour on here.
            I found out about RTK, the usefulness of Genki and an interesting way to keep track of my progress.

  2. Very respectful post. If I were running a top site on immersion, I don’t think I would’ve ever had the courage to compare myself in public to any other site.

    AJATT is not for me, though it used to be when I just started out with the immersion method. But I’m one of those certain people who just can’t handle his writing style. I’m sure other people get a kick out of it though or feel really inspired. I feel in the beginning it was less aggressive, or perhaps what I needed at the moment. I didn’t have any other opinions about language learning at the time, so the aggressive tone didn’t sound like it was putting me down or arguing with me.

    Also, I’d say I got turned away from ever reading the blog again right at the moment he started promoting the silverspoon package. I wavered back and forth before then because I disagreed on a lot of his points, while agreeing with others which would bring me back to the blog. If he had named the package something like, “guardian angel package” perhaps even that would’ve given me a better impression. There’s a lot in a name. Not that I would’ve bought it though if the name had been different. It’s just I might have kept reading his blog from time to time.

    I’m not the kind of person who pays for learning materials that aren’t native resources (such as J-J textbooks, manga, etc.). And if I were, my husband would redirect me and say, “You already have Japanese people to help you out.” He’s very frugal and turned me into a frugal person as well. But I totally understand bloggers needing a way to fund their effort. They totally deserve it! I’m just a tough person to sell to. If I really needed it, I would buy it.

    However, I honestly don’t need any of the products neither site is selling. Now, if AJATT or JALUP were able to buy the rights to sell the script of a movie with its language broken apart along with the dvd and other learning aides to go along with the movie and script, I would buy that. Learning aides that use native material, that’s what I’m into. That’s just a harder thing to pull off and perhaps not what either site is looking to make. So it just shows I may not be the target audience for the products they are selling.

    Method wise, I like the diplomatic but firm approach to JALUP more than the extremist approach of AJATT. I did end up using textbooks and classes (as tools though, not primary study methods), which is totally against AJATT’s method. However, did I become fluent in 18 months? No. Though I would attribute that to poor use of SRS (possibly, I don’t know) and at times not being as firm with my immersion environment as I should have been. But I didn’t feel encouraged by AJATT. It wasn’t until I found this site (2011), with it’s RPG theme and leveling up methods, that my Japanese really started to take off. I could actually benchmark my progress and I felt more encouraged to up my game. I’m still not fluent, but I raised from level 20 to level 40 in less than two years, compared to level 0 to 20 in three and a half. And in case my numbers are off, the comparable benchmarks I have obtained are the ability to read manga without a dictionary and watch Japanese movies and dramas without subtitles, which I didn’t have before reading JALUP. I really, really enjoy my Japanese learning environment now!

    So those are my thoughts on the two websites. I hope I didn’t hurt the feelings of any AJATT fans, as in my case it’s just a matter of what motivated me the most.

    • One small correction, since it appears in your comment and one below, AJATT is not against textbooks and there is even a blog post about how to use them. Also several are used as part of the SilverSpoon program.

      • Then perhaps my memory has been twisted overtime? (Memory is fallible.) Or he has changed positions? He has admitted changing positions in some of his blog posts on things (which is totally fine, I think it’s good to be willing to change your ideas rather than be stubborn about something). Remember, I read way early on, and haven’t really read anything around the silverspoon era.

        I think I remember him saying the only use one can get out of a textbook is grabbing sentences.

        But anyhow, thanks for the correction. I don’t want to mislead anyone.

        • Yes, pretty much the only thing he says use textbooks for is to get sentences, and avoid the explanations and just get them and understand them.

        • He’s always been critical of the traditional, classroom based approach mostly because of the insanely slow pace of most US classes. His rant on classes definitely includes some hate towards textbooks because they are an integral part of that whole system.

          The post on how to use a textbook was posted only nine days later and at that time he was still heavily against them but a reader pointed out how they could be useful and he agreed they could be used for sentence mining and not much else.

          Fast forward to the SilverSpoon era and he does recommend a few textbooks but none of them are really classroom textbooks. In fact it’s basically exactly what he advertises under “Phase 4: Sentences” under the main blog.

          While doing SilverSpoon I personally did use textbooks heavily, but they were stuff I had collected from my own classes and roommates who were departing Japan. I skipped the dialogs completely and focused on the grammar point examples and the reading selections. When you are a beginner this kind of material is definitely the way to go especially if you get frustrated with shonen manga like I did.

          • “He’s always been critical of the traditional, classroom based approach mostly because of the insanely slow pace of most US classes.”

            Likewise, I’m critical of the traditional, classroom based approach. I owe that caution to AJATT and am happy I’m not naively trying to rely on classes.

            I think classes can be nice, if you know how to use them. Especially if you already need the classes, it’s simply time you can spend with a Japanese native speaker who’s trained how to teach language (and therefore will most likely correct your mistakes, unlike strangers or friends who let it slide). Also, I feel classes really help when it comes to grammar lessons. It just is a quick way to get a grasp on more grammar.

            Classes aren’t necessary, and I think they can even be dangerous. As AJATT mentioned, classmates aren’t good speaking partners, because they make the same mistakes you do. It’ll only further perpetuate your mistakes. A lot of the time, because of the immersion method, you will be ahead of your classmates and end up guiding them, so it’s no benefit on your behalf (unless you happen to get experienced Japanese learners as classmates who have lived in Japan for quite a time, which happens in the advanced levels, then it tends to even out) In that case, you may actually learn from their extra knowledge. And classes are extremely slow paced. Naturally, through my immersion environment, I learned grammar that my classmates didn’t learn until semesters later because I wasn’t relying on classes.

            It’s best if the class uses a lot of native materials and is taught all in Japanese, however, that’s rare (at least in America). It’s unfortunate.

            I agree with the fact that all the negativity about textbooks comes from the focus their given in the classroom. They are just a guide, but teachers or schools build their whole curriculum on them, and even leave out things they could be using because it’s not in line with the textbook. (Like how Erin’s Challenge is a great program, but teachers will only recommend it as a supplement, not use it in the classroom, because it doesn’t match up with Genki)

            • But I think both AJATT and JALUP have pretty much the same feelings about classes. AJATT just seems a bit more extreme, putting you down for taking them at all. While JALUP gives pros and cons for taking them or not taking them.

            • JALUP seems a lot more organized but AJATT has some great stuff buried deep within and often buried behind the paywalls.

              In particular I think sentences without using clozes feels extremely dated. Whenever I come across a vanilla sentence card in my deck I either convert it to clozes or just delete it. They feel that useless to me now.

  3. My 2 cents

    Back in 2010 when I was in my very ripe and wise age of 13 I didn’t even want to learn Japanese, lol. I wanted to learn Korean. Though I just stopped Korean one day and remembered hearing about AJATT 2 years prior to that. I then proceeded to check it out and then pretty much read from top to bottom and started pretty much the next day with remembering the kanji and Anki, along with my immersion.

    Not sure if I’m correct, but I think this was before JALUP existed (November 2010)

    Either way, I pretty much followed everything Khatzumoto said, like I was a hardcore Catholic who lives on the bible, so I guess I treated AJATT religiously. I still sort of do, hehe :P It gave me a lot of guidance and for me, reading the posts pretty much told me everything to do, like going from point A to B to C, crystal clear. I just followed what he said word for word (for the most part)

    I was really attracted to his method, it was like nothing I’ve seen before.
    Mostly fun stuff + time = fluency, like wtf!?

    I don’t really think much about the money aspect, because I am just grateful for all the free advice he gave me. I mean, sure he has the AJATT+ and the silverspoon, but when you look at it, everything he says for free on his blog is all you really need. He didn’t have anything more than the knowledge he shares for free when he learned Japanese back in 04-06, no silver spoon or AJATT+ forum etc, So I am grateful for a free guide essentially.

    I do agree that his writing styles can be different at times, but no matter how it’s worded, I just look past it and try to find what he’s really trying to say.

    I don’t know, I guess to me Khatzumoto is just a wise man who I look up to like a role model. I’m not trying to sound crazy here but AJATT pretty much changed my life.

    I found JALUP about little less than a year ago (March 2012 or something) and I found it was a pretty interesting approach. Treating learning like an RPG with levels and etc was pretty cool. I like the level system because it sort of gives a gauge on how to scale your abilities. The numbers are a lot better than the, beginner, novice, intermediate, upper intermediate, advanced, very advanced, fluent, etc. More accuracy.

    Now I’ve been learning Japanese a little more than 2 years, and considering that I pretty much follow the religion of AJATT, I find it a little disappointing to say that my current level is around 55. Considering the time I’ve been studying, and since I try so hard to be like khatz, I feel a little upset about my level, but I’m sure that somewhere I didn’t do what I was supposed to. 自業自得。 I guess I should stop comparing myself to Khatz so much :P 

    I’m aiming to reach around 65 before the next school year starts (September 2013, So i have 8 months give or take). It won’t be easy, but at my current speed (trying to make up for my old mistakes in the process), I don’t think it’s impossible.

    I’ve read around 1300 pages of Japanese in the past 15 days (around 2500 pages by the end of this month I am aiming for), and I already felt myself being able to express what I want to say a little better. At this speed hopefully I can 超power level up to 65 in the next 8 months.

    I mean, next year my new school has a lot of Japanese people (compared to zero in my current junior high school), and I don’t want to be known as the guy who speaks average Japanese, I want to be known as the guy who speaks at least good Japanese. Enough so there are no crutches, and we can just act like normal people, instead of fumbling with what I want to say.

    That was longer than it was supposed to be, but whatever. :P

    • Wow, ライトニング, you’re doing some impressive stuff. I never would have taken on a project like this in junior high school (or been so successful with it), as I was more worried about not getting stuffed into a locker. :P

      Do you know about Read MOD? You should join us for the next go ’round.

      http://readmod.com/manual

    • Damn, your post just motivated me a lot! For a few days (weeks) I’ve been slowly dropping my immersion and stopped learning new stuff to catch back on reviews (I had stopped everything for a month I’m not too sure why even now).. but now I’m really motivated to be a bit stricter and do this thing! I’ve started learning mid september 2012 so not too long ago, but still only learned ~1100 kanji (and forgot a lot because of that month I was talking about); even though I was almost always doing 20-25 kanji a day, that’s an average of 8-9 kanji a day… maybe I should reduce that number to 15-20 and whenever I feel like doing more then do it, so I don’t get “burned out” or something! I even made my own exp system (not perfect, technically I’d be level 20-22 by now even though I am not haha but itll catch up as soon as I start doing sentences) so this should help motivate! Thanks!

    • Similar story here, but I was 14 (3 years ago).
      I searched “self-study Japanese”, and I found Khatz’s site. Through this very site I: started using spaced repetition software, began enjoying Japanese media, and utilized timeboxing. (These were Khatz’s most significant influences in my Japanese/academic study, in the sense that he introduced me to these ideas). What I got from the site was the basic structure to learning Japanese, and some tips to make the process more efficient.

      AJATT is inspiring, if you’re not so cynical. Although confusing at times, the “method” is actually pretty straightforward.

      I don’t think of it as “long-winded”, I call it “very thorough”. :D

      Great review btw.

  4. I was yet another person who found AJATT before I found this site, and was blown away by the concepts and ideas at first. This was the first I heard of the idea of immersion, sentences, etc. and I was really flabbergasted by the concepts and jumped right in.

    I like AJATT, but when I tried to use his methods in reality, it just flopped. He told me to just jump in after RTK and start getting sentences, so that’s what I did. I had no understanding of grammar or anything, which turned out to be a HUGE burden, so I just became frustrated and gave up on Japanese for a while. I loved the idea, but my body just wasn’t ready for the immersion yet.

    Just a few weeks ago, I found a link to JALUP. Once I read your description on how to go about mining sentences (first from a beginner’s book like Genki and only learn one new word per sentence) I was blown away and have now jumped back into sentences with resounding success. I think this website is MUCH more clear and organized when you are making your jump into sentences, which is why I stick around here.

    In terms of AJATT selling out, yeah, the only thing that bothers me is when he says things like “you would have known about this earlier if you paid to be in AJATT+/Neutrino/whatever.”

  5. I love AJATT.

    My story: I decided after graduating college that I wanted to teach English in Japan. So in order to prepare for that route I started learning Japanese on my own. I tried literally everything I could think of. I walked around town trying to memorize phrase books line by line. I learned Hiragana and Katakana through repetitious writing, but that I can honestly say was a step completed before AJATT. I also tried learning Kanji and made it to page 5 of my kanji book about 600 times before I started wondering if I might not be able to learn these in a timely manner…

    Then AJATT. Remembering the Kanji, Spaced Repetition, Immersion, time boxing, passive listening, going monolingual, the three-foot radius idea, changing all of my music and media to Japanese, KILLING SUBTITLES on anime and all of that just blew my mind. I can honestly say I began learning Japanese finally after a year of studying it hardcore and solo.

    However I just beat myself up for not being perfect too much. I wanted to be Khatz, not me. I even wanted to learn Cantonese at one point just because he was doing it. You have to tweak AJATT and any method to work for you. You are not the slave of methods, you are the ruthless sultan of a brothel filled with methods and techniques. When they don’t suit you, you just send them away. I think this is the most important post I ever read on AJATT because it finally gave me full control of my results (e.g. I stopped blaming Khatz for my lack of success.) is this:

    http://www.alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/make-the-process-fit-the-person

    Read Khatz, read Benny the Irish Polyglot, read Glossika, 等 and the parts that inspire you when you read them are the things you ought to try out in your own learning. Don’t be a disciple, be a colleague, an equal with these folks you admire.

  6. I think Khatz’s heart is in the right place. He was passionate about learning Japanese, and was young when he started, as well as bilingual, and probably a bit talented. So the only negative I’d note (as I’ve written on Japanese Rule of 7), is that the time frame is unrealistic. Not everybody has his advantages. It will take most people longer than he states, and many people much longer. I don’t think we’ll see any published results from him any time soon.

    People who start out with false hopes end up giving up, and that’s a shame, because they shouldn’t. Not everybody’s going to become fluent in a year or two.

  7. Personally, I found the layout of AJATT to be a little confusing.. It was hard to find useful things to use (especially since I am still very much a beginner). Sure, once I found the tabe of contents, it was easier, but I feel I really needn’t dig around simply to find that. (or maybe I just suck at navigating)

    I found his site much easier to find information in, though, so it’s a little more useful for me (at least so far ^^;)

    Both have their merits, though, I think.

  8. I’m also another Ajatt “fan”, I can relate my feelings with several of the comments above, especially the one from ライトニング, but in the end of the day the progress is only what matters I guess. One of the points that I like the most is about not being perfectionist from this post:

    http://www.alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/are-you-learning-japanese-the-wrong-way

    Since last January when my learning journey officially started I skip several days without doing reps or learning new words but regardless of that I happily reach level 40, probably I could have done things better, learning a little every day instead of quick bursts but I try to not think about it.

    I also had so many doubts but now I strongly believe that is possible to reach fluency in 2 years, I can already smell it, I’m playing bioshock infinite and immersed in all that “advanced” unknown vocab, trying to roughly figure it out by the kanjis while hanging in a skyline and popping the enemies heads.

  9. I’m someone who actually joined Silverspoon back in 2012 and was so far from fluent by the end that I requested a refund. And I have actually been refused most of my refund (He’s sending it out to me in $100 chunks…).

    So think what you will of his methods, but this guy can’t be trusted with your money. I’m not sure if he’s broke or just a piece of shit, but there’s been no explanation on his behalf, so I’m not too happy.

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